Going to college is a decision many students make as an effort to land the best possible job following graduation. Over the course of four years, students hone in on their skills in hopes that they will pay off. Unfortunately, many students don't take advantage of starting their career planning while still in school and thus get thrown out to the sharks unprepared and unsure after graduation. So what can college students start doing now to ensure they are ready to begin a career after graduation?

Lately, there have been a lot of misconceptions about college sports and the athletes that play them. One of the biggest controversies is surrounding the pay student-athletes get during their collegiate years. However, there are a lot of rumors and myths that need to be cleared up before these controversies can be understood. Many of these athletes are getting paid with a full scholarship to a top university. Some may look at this as a carrot at the end of a stick, but if you - the athlete - play your cards right, you could be a part of a really great team and graduate with an in-demand degree. Here are five common myths about playing sports in college.

College students spend a ridiculous amount of their free time studying and reading. Whether it's textbooks, whitepapers, online articles or Wikipedia pages, college students are enveloping themselves in the written word. Unfortunately, many college students forget to read things that they genuinely enjoy or that provide useful information without coming across as super educational. In order to get a well-rounded education both in and outside of the classroom, I recommend taking some time each week to read these blogs. Not only will they teach new things in a different way, but they will also provide inspiration and life lessons that can't be taught in a lecture hall.

If you are getting ready to graduate from college, then you should definitely check out a job fair or two on campus before you finish school. If you go somewhere like USC Online, then you might want to check into job fairs at the closest university. This way you can get a head start on your job search before you graduate when the pressure is really on. Here are 5 benefits of attending a college job fair.

It doesn't matter if you are a writer or not a writer, a writing workshop in college can be immensely beneficial. Not only can it give you a sense of camaraderie with other writers - but it can also improve your own writing. If you are in a student journalism course, a workshop can make you a much more dynamic reporter. Even if you are getting USC's MPA degree or a business degree from Dartmouth College, a workshop can make your proposals better and your research papers much more interesting and fun to read. On top of everything, it will look great on your transcripts. This is why you want to consider some of the reasons why you should be taking a writing workshop. Here are four reasons to take a writing workshop in college.

A lot of people like to mock the idea of going to art school because they think that it is an expensive waste of time. Although, this all depends on where you study and what you want to do with your degree. There are definitely people who manage to have lucrative careers in the art without going to art school, but there are not that many of them. If you really want to compete in today's art market, you're going to need to be educated. Here is the art school demystified.